Bipolar Disorder Articles and Stories

For Bipolar Disorder Supporters




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    Laughter can be just as important to successful treatment as medication.  In fact, the Bible says, “A cheerful heart does good like medicine.” 

     

    Laughter can be just as important to successful treatment as medication.  In fact, the Bible says, “A cheerful heart does good like medicine.” 

    Some people downplay their loved one's depression (often unintentionally) by saying something trivial, thinking that will help their loved one, as if that is the one thing they needed to hear. While some of these thoughts have been helpful to some people, the majority of them are not, and can even make things worse.

    Summertime is here, and many parents of children with bipolar disorder are getting ready to send their children to camp, so checklists are on the minds of many supporters at this time.  This made me think of the following checklist.

    Every supporter of a loved one with bipolar disorder would like to believe that what they are doing is offering help to their loved one; however, sometimes without knowing it, their "help" actually hinders their loved one's recovery.

    Let me ask you something.  Before your loved one was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, was every day a walk in the park for them?  Did every day spring up roses for you?  I know I may be sounding a little "out there" here, but I’m trying to make a point.  NOBODY has an absolutely perfect day, every day of their life, whether they have bipolar disorder or not.

    Recently, the Sydney Morning Herald reported a story about a woman named Susan Allan.  Susan has bipolar disorder, but has learned to cope and deal with it through a series of positive life choices.

    MailOnline recently did a very interesting story about a man in England named Bill Oddie, who has bipolar disorder.  He says that last year didn't really exist for him, being a "complete wipeout," as he was mired in depression, staring at walls, sleeping and, at times, considering suicide.

    Does your loved one seem to be drifting away from you?  Do they seem distant?  Do they act like they don't want to be with you (or anyone else)?  Are they not communicating with you?  Is it hard to get their attention?  If these things are happening in your relationship, it may not be your loved one's fault (or, for that matter, your fault either).

    Many supporters of a loved one with bipolar disorder actually feel shame because of it, but that's because we still have stigma in our society.  Being labeled with mental illness has long been a stigma, and stigma often produces shame. 

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