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Bipolar News

January 11, 2006

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Risk of puerperal psychosis highest after birth of first baby
News-Medical.net - Sydney,Australia
The risk of bipolar affective puerperal psychosis - a severe mental illness following childbirth - is highest after the birth of a first baby, a new study has ...

Long's future uncertain
Daytona Beach News-Journal - Daytona,FL,USA
... He said he was later diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder, a milder form of manic depression, and is now taking "nonnarcotic" medication for both that ...

Risk of puerperal psychosis highest after birth of first baby
News-Medical-Net Tue
The risk of bipolar affective puerperal psychosis - a severe mental illness following childbirth - is highest after the birth of a first baby, a new study has confirmed.

Three sisters enter guilty pleas in theft scheme
Baltimore
Three sisters acknowledged roles yesterday in what an assistant state attorney general described as a scheme to steal nearly $65,000 from the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund, where, she said, one sister used her job as a claims adjuster to issue bogus checks.

Mental Illness Plagued Church Musical Director
Los Angeles Times
The Crystal Cathedral's prominent composer had threatened suicide well before the standoff.

Outpatient treatment opens new avenues for Coles County Mental Health Center patients.

Herald & Review (Decatur, IL) (via Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News); 1/8/2006

Byline: Dave Fopay

Jan. 8--MATTOON -- Vanessa Nelson had no hesitation talking about her past problems and her evaluation of the methods used to treat those problems.

Nelson spoke easily and confidently about her 17 years of dealing with conditions diagnosed as borderline personality disorder, a bipolar condition and post-traumatic stress.

She described the outpatient treatment she now receives at the Coles County Mental Health Center as "freedom," while the institutionalized care she once received was "prison" in comparison.

"You're making choices for yourself," Nelson said of the outpatient approach. "In an institution, they can choose what clothes you wear, what time you wake up."

Officials at the mental health center credit the growth in outpatient treatment as a large reason behind the center's corresponding growth in services. That growth is behind the decision to relocate the center to the site of the now-closed Blaw-Knox plant.

"There is a focus on recovery in the community," said Lynette Ashmore, the center's director of community support services.

Nelson, 31, said she was first institutionalized when she was 14 years old and estimated the number of times she has been in that kind of treatment at around 200, varying from "a few days to a few weeks." She started outpatient treatment at the Mental Health Center about six years ago and likened institutionalized treatment to a "revolving door."

"You go in and get duct-taped up," Nelson said. "You go out and the tape falls off and you go back and get more duct tape."

She said she feels she's had more success with outpatient treatment because of "just the fact that I'm out of the house" and she has a chance to build relationships with the center's other clients, who notice when she's not there. She attends group meetings and individualized sessions.

"Between me and my counselor, we can decide what groups are most appropriate for me," she said. "I've built relationships here."

That's a far cry, she said, from "sitting in a room with no one to talk to," and she also said outpatient therapy gives her and other clients a better chance at learning appropriate behavior and completing chores such as shopping for themselves.

Dave Fopay can be reached at dfopay@;jg-tc.com or 348-5733.

Copyright (c) 2006, Herald & Review, Decatur, Ill.

Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News.

For information on republishing this content, contact us at (800) 661-2511 (U.S.), (213) 237-4914 (worldwide), fax (213) 237-6515, or e-mail reprints@krtinfo.com.

COPYRIGHT 2006 Herald & Review

Symposium opens up on mental health.

The Bradenton Herald (Bradenton, Florida) (via Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News); 1/8/2006

Byline: Wendy Dahle

Jan. 8--SARASOTA -- Chris Kakouris remembers most of his life feeling like he has been living in the dark. It has been hard to complete tasks, and relationships have been difficult for the 41-year-old guitar player.

"I'm unhappy," he said. "I've always felt like there's been something missing." Kakouris suffers from depression, bi-polar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and anxiety. He said traditional mental health treatments have not helped. On Saturday, he was listening to experts at the Sunshine from Darkness symposium at Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota speak about the latest advancements in mental health, hoping to find some options. The symposium was presented by NARSAD, the largest privately funded organization for brain disorder research previously known as the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression. The organization was started in 1981 as the American Schizophrenia Foundation. "This is a disease that has to be treated like cancer or heart disease," said Mike Vizvary, spokesman for NARSAD Florida. "The idea is to bring them the latest in research and get them talking about it." Early on in the symposium, Kakouris was fascinated with what he heard about new devices for treating brain disorders called Vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS, and transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS. He has tried a variety of medications and other treatments to no avail, he said. "I think that's a step in the right direction," Kakouris said. VNS is "the new kid on the block," in treating severely depressed patients resistant to traditional mental health treatments like medication, cognitive therapy and electric shock treatments, according to presenter John O'Reardon, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. VNS was approved by the Food and Drug Administration last July. TMS is not yet available in the United States, but O'Reardon predicted it would be accepted later this year. According to statistics provided by O'Reardon, 20 million adults suffer from severe depression in the United States. Of those, 4 million are chronically ill or chronically impaired. Suicide kills 30,000 people each year, and is the third most prevalent killer in people ages 15 to 45. "If you really want to help these people, you need these treatments," O'Reardon told the audience of about 1,500 people about the new devices. VNS requires an outpatient procedure to implant a device in the chest that delivers pulses of energy to the Vagus nerve in the neck, O'Reardon said. The procedure costs about $25,000. "It's not a major surgery," he said. O'Reardon said VNS and similar devices are more precise than drugs. Unlike medications, with VNS or TMS there is no weight gain, no metabolic issues and no sexual side effects. Patients receive treatments daily. One-third of the patients O'Reardon tested were considered well within a year of starting VNS. "It starts slowly and builds strongly," he said.

Other speakers brought their latest findings to the symposium, which was free to the public and ran from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m., followed by a brief question-and-answer session. John Calabrese, a psychiatry professor from Case Western Reserve University, presented the latest on management of depression and bipolar disorder. John Rush, a psychiatry professor from the University of Texas, presented his research on treatment algorithms for improving outcomes in depressed patients. And Wade Berrettini, a psychiatry professor at the University of Pennsylvania, talked about nicotine addiction in psychiatric disorders.

Copyright (c) 2006, The Bradenton Herald, Fla.

Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News.

For information on republishing this content, contact us at (800) 661-2511 (U.S.), (213) 237-4914 (worldwide), fax (213) 237-6515, or e-mail reprints@krtinfo.com.

COPYRIGHT 2006 The Bradenton Herald

Crisis in our classrooms - reports reveal the disturbing threat to safety.

Australasian Business Intelligence; 1/8/2006

Jan 08, 2006 (The Daily Telegraph - ABIX via COMTEX) -- New South Wales schools are dealing with increasing numbers of cases of mental illness. Schools have filed serious incident reports with the Department of Education, which reveal that some students have committed suicide or tried to harm themselves in 2005. Doctors have warned that children are now being treated for bipolar disorder. This is one of the most serious mental illnesses and 30 per cent of sufferers exhibit symptoms in their teenage years.

Publication Date: 9 January 2006

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING

All copyright subsisting under the Copyright Act 1968 (Commonwealth) resides in us. No part of the copyright materials may be reproduced, re-used, re-transmitted, adapted, published, broadcast or distributed for any commercial purposes whatsoever without our prior written permission.

COPYRIGHT 2006 News provided by Comtex.

Inmate dead in apparent suicide: Autopsy on man found in Glenn Detention Center cell scheduled for.

The State (Columbia, South Carolina) (via Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News); 1/7/2006

Byline: Christina Knauss

Jan. 7--A 33-year-old inmate at the Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center in Richland County was found dead Friday morning in what officials are calling a suicide.

Richland County Coroner Gary Watts said the man's death appeared to be "suicide by hanging." The man was found in his cell about 11:45 a.m. Friday, but the media was not notified by county officials until after 6 p.m.

The man's name had not been released Friday night, pending notification of family members, Watts said.

Watts said an autopsy will be performed on the man this morning. He said the inmate apparently had been booked into the jail on drug charges but had not been on any kind of suicide or medical watch.

Watts and officials from the Richland County Sheriff's Department were at the jail Friday to conduct an investigation into the man's death.

Neither Watts nor Richland County Sheriff's Department spokesman Chris Cowan could provide further details about what the inmate had been charged with or the manner of his death.

Richland County runs the detention center.

The inmate would be the second to have committed suicide at the jail in a year.

On May 20, 2005, Richland County jail inmate Antonio Richburg, 29, of Columbia was found hanging in his cell.

In a letter to his wife the day before, Richburg had complained he had not received his medications for seven days. Richburg suffered from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

A jury during a Richland County coroner's inquest held July found that jail workers contributed to Richburg's death.

In August, Tiffany Richburg, his widow, filed suit against Prison Health Services, a Tennessee-based company that had been hired to provide mental health services for Richland County inmates.

In September, Richland County officials fired the company.

Reach Knauss at (803) 771-8507 or cknauss@thestate.com [mailto:cknauss@thestate.com]

Copyright (c) 2006, The State, Columbia, S.C.

Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News.

For information on republishing this content, contact us at (800) 661-2511 (U.S.), (213) 237-4914 (worldwide), fax (213) 237-6515, or e-mail reprints@krtinfo.com.

COPYRIGHT 2006 The State

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