Bipolar Disorder Articles and Stories

For Bipolar Disorder Supporters




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    People with bipolar disorder need help and support from others. You need to recognize this and be proactive in getting them treated. However, you must also help the person take charge of their life.

    Much is talked about when it comes to bipolar support for the person who has bipolar disorder, but what about bipolar support for the supporter? It is just as important, if not crucial, that the supporter of a loved one with bipolar disorder finds support for themselves to avoid supporter burnout.

    It may be difficult to find bipolar supporter articles, although you can find some if you look hard enough.  Bipolar articles are plentiful on the Internet—all you have to do is go up to the Google search bar on your computer screen and type in the words bipolar disorder, and click on GO.  Then sit back and wait, and soon you will have more bipolar articles to choose from than you can imagine!

    If you are a supporter to a loved one with bipolar disorder, you are undoubtedly going to run across problems that you will have to solve.  Following are 12 steps to effective problem solving if you are a supporter:

    Many of us (supporters) have found it difficult to communicate with our loved ones when they aren't in an episode, much less when they are in one.  Because of the unpredictability of their responses, many of us have even given up trying to communicate with our loved ones when they are in an episode, which just leaves us frustrated and sometimes angry, among other feelings.

    Many supporters are overwhelmed by the fact that their loved one has bipolar disorder.  They feel like the disorder has taken over their lives, and that there is no room for improvement in their life.  Yet everybody that I speak to wants to improve their life, but many of them are faced with the same questions:
    The greatest difficulty with getting good information on bipolar disorder is not knowing where to get it.  When your loved one is first diagnosed with bipolar disorder, their doctor or psychiatrist may give them a brochure or pamphlet that describes bipolar disorder in general.  Usually that’s all they will get, unless he/she gives them samples of medication and, in that case, they might receive an additional brochure or pamphlet put out by the drug company that makes that particular medication.  Generally speaking, however, that’s it.  You are on your own after that, to try to understand this new and confusing diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

    If your loved one has bipolar disorder, there may be times that they will feel depressed.  You may not know what the right thing to say or do is during those times, and you certainly don't want to make things worse for them.

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