Bipolar Disorder Articles and Stories

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    The book is written by Dottie Pacharis, Scotty’s mother, and is told over the course of thirteen years, during which time Scotty was committed 14 times to 11 different hospitals for his manic episodes – escaping from two of them – all along the east coast of the country. Reading this book, you continually ask yourself, “How could this have happened?” Even as you read the events as they transpired, appalled as, time and time again, Scotty was able to manipulate judges during hearings as he claimed he “is not bipolar, has never been bipolar,” and the judges believed him, releasing him without committing him even though he was obviously very ill.

    It may be difficult to find bipolar supporter articles, although you can find some if you look hard enough.  Bipolar articles are plentiful on the Internet—all you have to do is go up to the Google search bar on your computer screen and type in the words bipolar disorder, and click on GO.  Then sit back and wait, and soon you will have more bipolar articles to choose from than you can imagine!

    The greatest difficulty with getting good information on bipolar disorder is not knowing where to get it.  When your loved one is first diagnosed with bipolar disorder, their doctor or psychiatrist may give them a brochure or pamphlet that describes bipolar disorder in general.  Usually that’s all they will get, unless he/she gives them samples of medication and, in that case, they might receive an additional brochure or pamphlet put out by the drug company that makes that particular medication.  Generally speaking, however, that’s it.  You are on your own after that, to try to understand this new and confusing diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

    If your loved one has bipolar disorder, there may be times that they will feel depressed.  You may not know what the right thing to say or do is during those times, and you certainly don't want to make things worse for them.

    I receive so many emails and phone calls from people confused about what causes bipolar disorder. At least once every few weeks, someone contacts me wondering if the bipolar experienced by their loved one or themselves is the result of someone placing a curse on them. Although people who have untreated, unmanaged bipolar disorder may feel cursed, this is NOT a cause of the disorder.

    Summertime is here, and many parents of children with bipolar disorder are getting ready to send their children to camp, so checklists are on the minds of many supporters at this time.  This made me think of the following checklist.

    Every supporter of a loved one with bipolar disorder would like to believe that what they are doing is offering help to their loved one; however, sometimes without knowing it, their "help" actually hinders their loved one's recovery.

    Many supporters of a loved one with bipolar disorder actually feel shame because of it, but that's because we still have stigma in our society.  Being labeled with mental illness has long been a stigma, and stigma often produces shame. 

    Many people with bipolar disorder struggle with the fact that they wish they could be more patient.  Becoming more patient is something that, with practice, is something you can learn.  Once you have learned to become more patient, you will also notice the added benefit of a lower stress level.

    If you have allowed your life to be changed due to your loved one's diagnosis of bipolar disorder to the degree that you no longer do the things you used to do, or live the way you used to live, then you could be letting bipolar disorder overwhelm you, and that would be wrong.

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